Is ADHD a Super Power?

Hello May zebras and spoonies. Thank you for coming in and visiting and hanging out with me today. I’m glad that your hare. Yeah.

All right, so today I’m going to talk about ADHD again, still, some more. One of the things that people often talk about is ADHD is a superpower. Yeah, I don’t buy into that. I personally don’t feel like my ADHD is superpower. A lot of my ADHD stuff makes me a hot mess. I mean, there are days that I sit here and I think to myself, “Am I really an adult?” because I don’t feel like I’m doing these things right. Let’s just be honest having difficulty paying attention and being impulsive and having dysregulation of your emotions is hard and it can be messy. It can make life complicated, and it just can make everything else in your life so much harder.

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Stimming

Hello, my zebras and spoonies. Thank you for coming and hanging out with me today. I am glad that you are here!

Today, I’m going to talk about some of the myths around stimming.

Well, first of all, what is stimming? Stimming is a self stimulatory behavior, and it is a sensation seeking that can ease feelings of anxiety, frustration and boredom. Some people find stimming pleasurable, or fun or relaxing.

The first myth that I want to address around stimming is that it is something that only neurodivergent people do. The truth is that stimming is something that every human being alive engages in to some degree, because stimming exists on a continuum, just like most of human behavior. Most people stim, at least some of the time. So, if you’re chewing on a pencil, biting your nails, tapping your fingers on a desk, twirling your hair around your finger, flattening out the wrinkles in your clothes etc. these things are stimming behaviors. They’re things that we engage in, when we’re bored or frustrated or anxious, and we all do it, you don’t have to be autistic or ADHD to be doing the whole stimming thing. That’s the first myth.

The second myth is that somehow stimming is harmful. It’s not 99% of the time. Stimming is just a repetitive behavior that humans engaged in that has a sense of familiarity and habituation that makes us feel comfortable and safe. It’s completely harmless, there’s no harm in drumming your fingers on the table unless you’re sitting next to somebody who will thump you for it. There are some kinds of stimming that can cause physical damage and these self injurious behaviors need to be addressed, but that is not stimming as a whole. I mean some people engage in nail biting to the point that it causes bleeding painful fingers. This is problematic. There are people who engage in skin picking, where they create wounds, and there are people who bang their head against a wall. All of these behaviors are self injurious. And that’s what’s problematic, not the fact that they’re stimming. So we really need to look at the behavior on a case by case basis and evaluate their behavior for itself and its own sake and ask, Is it causing harm for this individual and if it’s not, leave it alone, because we all do it.

In fact, most stimming behavior is largely ignored. I mean most people don’t think about it when somebody is smoothing over their hair or twirling a strand of hair with their finger. We don’t look at that and say, oh, this person is stimming and they’re anxious. But that’s probably exactly what’s going on. They’re anxious in this social interaction, and they’re engaging in this stimming behavior by twirling their hair around their finger, and it’s helping them deal with the anxiety of the social interaction that they’re currently engaging in. And it’s totally part of being human.

So those are my two myths that I wanted to bust. Is that stimming is part of being human, not part of being neurodivergent. And that stimming is harmful because it’s really not. There are some types of stimming that’s harmful, but it’s a really small minority. For the most part, stim on. And, hey, Get your relaxation and your comfort where they come.

The Wall

One of the things about ADHD that many people don’t know about is “the wall.” Well, that’s what I call it anyway. I go on screech for endless days and seem full of an eternal amount of mental energy. Until I’m not. And it comes sudden. I just hit this wall and then all I want to do is curl up in a hole and hide from the world. This cloud of apathy swallows me up and I find it a struggle to get just the every day things done. A deep, aching brain fatigue washes over me. For some reason, the world doesn’t recognize “the wall” as a valid reason for an impromptu vacation from life for a few days so I have to continue to slog through and it completely sucks.

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Getting Compression Socks

Hello Zebras and Spoonies!

Thanks for stopping by and visiting with me. Today I’m going to be talking about compression socks.

There are many medical conditions that benefit from compression therapy. Everything from blood pooling, edema, pain management and sensory needs can be helped with compression. The challenge is that our doctors often recommend getting compression socks but then we’re left solo trying to figure out which socks we should be wearing. If you’re new to compression socks, here’s my list of tips to help you find your perfect pair.

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War of Rodents…

Let me start by introducing you to my beaver.

No, not that beaver. Pervert. This beaver lives in my head and his name is OCD. Yeah, as in Obsessive Compulsive Disorder. There is a lot that people don’t tend to know about beavers. Most know that they are hard working and forever active on “making things work.” But most don’t know that they also have issues with running water. That’s right. When a beaver hears running water, it is compelled to build a dam. The water must not flow. Period. Running water is bad. Why? Because the beaver’s brain says so. That’s right, beavers have OCD. And I have an OCD beaver in my head.

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No Reason

I find it frustrating when people expect there to be a rational reason behind my compulsions. If it was rational it wouldn’t be OCD. I do it because my brain says so. And I pick my battles. If it isn’t something that gets in the way, I let it be. It doesn’t matter that I tap light switches or turn spoons down or change my socks several times a day or check the clock a hundred times a day (yes, literally). These things don’t impair my day to day function. So, I let them be. There is no point investing energy in fighting these compulsions when they cause no harm and don’t get in the way of anything.

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042218

Just for one day…
I wish I could know this dance.
What is there to see in your eyes?
Why do your hands pause or flutter?
Is there a secret song I’ve never heard?

I don’t know the rules,
But I still have to play the social game.
Roll the dice and take a risk.
Now will you hate me?

ADHD Filter

There is no filter in my brain. I’m sitting there, trying to do something but I cant focus because I can’t shut anything out. I hear every sound: the drip of the faucet, the tick of the clock and whatever that weird clicking noise is. I feel the fabric on my skin, the fan, the pressure of the chair against my legs. What’s that clicking? I smell the shampoo I used, my husband’s coffee, I wonder what my daughter just microwaved? Smells good. What’s that clicking noise?! I see the flutter of the curtain out of the corner of my eye and have to look up at it to be sure nothing is coming at me. What is clicking?! Man, my daughter’s food smells good. Every stimulus leads to a thought. Each thought can tumble into a rabbit hole of rushing ideas. Got to fix that faucet. Man that clock is loud. Who knew clocks were so loud? Why are they so loud? Wonder if they all make the same noise. What is that clicking? That coffee smells so nice. But coffee is a lie. It never tastes as good as it smells… and on and on and on like that.