Chloride

When you have chronic illness, it isn’t uncommon to have problems with electrolyte imbalances. Because of that, I’ve decided to do a series that talks about what they are, how the body uses them and things that we can do to manage our electrolytes. For the next seven weeks, I will make a post on Wednesday about one of the electrolytes.

Today we are talking about Chloride. While this is one of the electrolytes generally not discussed, it is highly important in our bodies. Chloride is, after sodium, the most abundant electrolyte in serum, with a key role in the regulation of body fluids, electrolyte balance, the preservation of electrical neutrality, acid-base status and it is an essential component for the assessment of many pathological conditions. The normal adult value for chloride is 97-107 mEq/L. 

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Calcium

When you have chronic illness, it isn’t uncommon to have problems with electrolyte imbalances. Because of that, I’ve decided to do a series that talks about what they are, how the body uses them and things that we can do to manage our electrolytes. For the next few weeks, I will make a post on Wednesday about one of the electrolytes.

Calcium is the most abundant mineral in the human body with 99% of it being within the bones and teeth. It also helps the body maintain neuro conduction. This means that calcium is essential for normal muscle movement and for your heart to function properly. Normal lab values for calcium range from 8.5 to 10.2 mg/dL.

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Potassium

Potassium is a mineral that your body needs to work properly. It is a type of electrolyte. It helps your nerves to function and muscles to contract. It helps your heartbeat stay regular. It also helps move nutrients into cells and waste products out of cells. A diet rich in potassium helps to offset some of sodium’s harmful effects on blood pressure. A normal blood result for potassium is 3.5-5.

So, it’s pretty important to make sure that you are getting enough.

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Sodium

Sodium helps maintain normal blood pressure, supports the work of your nerves and muscles, and regulates your body’s fluid balance. A normal blood sodium level is between 135 and 145 milliequivalents per liter (mEq/L). Hypernatremia (high blood sodium levels) is when your blood level is above 145. Hyponatremia (low blood sodium levels) is when your blood level is below 135. Diagnosing either hypernatremia or hyponatremia is done with lab work. Urine testing can also be done, but is generally not considered necessary.

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The Challenge of Eating

Hello my Zebras and Spoonies! Thanks for stopping by and visiting with me today!

Like many of us with chronic illness, I have challenges when trying to eat. I have to eat a special diet in order to keep my stomach happy and to avoid having flares. I eat a low glycemic index, high sodium, high fluid, pescatarian and low histamine diet. Which is to say: I eat within a really narrow range of “safe foods.” Does this sounds familiar? Maybe not the same diet, but the same struggle?

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Update 120820

Been a busy couple weeks with doctor appointments. I have been lucky and have been getting really good doctors. That makes things so much easier! 

I saw the cardiologist and am now formally diagnosed with POTS. Not changing anything with my management at this point, but having the diagnosis helps. Good to know for sure what I’m dealing with and helps keep all my providers in the know.  

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Update 050420

The last few days have been difficult, high pain days. Had a dystonic storm on Saturday, which was an unexpected work out. In order to stop the storm, I had to take a high dose of benadryl which kicked my butt. Have been resting and trying to let my body recover.  

I haven’t been eating as well as I should and it has resulted in exacerbation of my symptoms. The stress of all that has been going on is also a factor. But I have more control over my diet then the stress. I do what I can to manage the stress levels, but there is only so much I can do in that department. However, I have control over my diet. So, I need to eat better.